Toronto Metropolitan University
Browse
6e6b54f39e6c93e07423e8c7ffda7e95.pdf (657.87 kB)

Authenticity as Survival Strategy: The Immigrant Experience of Japanese Chef on Identities and Food

Download (657.87 kB)
thesis
posted on 2024-06-17, 18:17 authored by Megumi Noteboom

Japanese chefs, as a small group of highly skilled foreign trained professionals, can be viewed as one of relatively privileged minorities in the Canadian multicultural context. However, being "privileged" immigrants does not mean they do not experience settlement challenges and disadvantages derived from their minority status in Canada. This paper delves into their specific challenges and the strategies they utilize to navigate their lives in Toronto, Canada. This study employs the phenomenological approach to illuminate individual experiences by examining how the Japanese culinary scene in Toronto is perceived by a sample of Japanese chefs and Japanese food business owners. Through narrative interviews, I aim to better understand the participants' subjective interpretations of what authenticity in the Japanese food scene is Toronto and how this intersects with their personal sense of cultural identity.

History

Language

eng

Degree

  • Master of Arts

Program

  • Immigration and Settlement Studies

Granting Institution

Ryerson University

LAC Thesis Type

  • MRP

Thesis Advisor

Mustafa Koc

Usage metrics

    Immigration and Settlement Studies (MRPs)

    Categories

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC